Our Mission

Creating a Greener Greater Boston for Future Generations

In Partnership with the Barr Foundation

The Solomon Foundation champions Greater Boston’s public green spaces and their unique contribution to the quality of urban life. Our mission is to provide a complete and connected network of beautiful parks and greenways linking Greater Boston neighborhoods. Founded by David Solomon and Herb Nolan in 2005, the Solomon Foundation seeks to frame visionary, yet practical, projects and help get them built. Working with and in support of diverse partners across many governmental agencies and neighborhoods, we help drive greenway projects forward.

A Greener Greater Boston (AGGB) is a program of the Solomon Foundation in partnership with the Barr Foundation. AGGB was started in 2016 to scale up the greenway and placemaking work of the Solomon Foundation.

You can learn more about some of our current projects below.

FEATURED PROJECTS

With our partners, we prioritize projects that are part of a system of shared paths and parks; serve dense urban neighborhoods in need of open space; are beautiful, well-loved, and well-cared-for; and enhance the health and well-being of people and the environment. Here is a selection of innovative projects  made possible by collaboration of dedicated public and private partners.

Brewer Fountain and Plaza
Brewer Fountain and Plaza

The plaza and park surrounding the fully restored Brewer Fountain were transformed into one of Boston’s most iconic places.

Charlesgate
Charlesgate

The proposed Charlesgate paths and parks will reconnect the Charles River Basin with the Back Bay Fens and reclaim an area overshadowed by highway infrastructure since the mid-20th century.

Clippership Connector
Clippership Connector

The half-mile Clippership Connector path, named for the Clipperships once built on these shores, will form a critical link in a regional trail system reaching from the Mystic River to the Charles River and the northwestern suburbs.

Eliot Memorial Plaza
Eliot Memorial Plaza

For decades the Charles Eliot Memorial was overlooked and largely forgotten. This project was intended to create a worthy setting for the memorial, frame views to the river basin, and establish one of the few gathering areas on the Esplanade.

Esplanade Boat Docks
Esplanade Boat Docks

DCR restored four docks over a four-year period starting in 2007 with private support.

Malden River Greenway Plan
Malden River Greenway Plan

The Solomon Foundation championed the need for a Malden River Greenway Plan and assembled the coalition to finance a plan. The plan was completed with the help of Utile Design under the direction of the Mystic River Watershed Association.

Northern Strand Community Trail
Northern Strand Community Trail

Upon completion, the Northern Strand Community Trail will be a continuous 12-mile shared use path from the Mystic River to the Lynn seashore.

Watertown Riverfront Park
Watertown Riverfront Park

A decade of advocacy helped to restore this mile-long stretch of trail along the Charles in Watertown as an accessible river front park and a regional greenway link.

Our Process

Listen and Collaborate Around a Shared Vision

Working with public and private partners, the Solomon Foundation identifies projects that will significantly improve Greater Boston’s major public parks and greenways. We look for projects that inspire, that innovate, and that attract more people to enjoy the outdoors. These are projects that would likely not happen without a private partner. We do not attempt to do the heavy lifting of government agencies, nor could we. We act as a catalyst to instigate and support government action.

Feature Story

The History of Greenways

The story of an American idea in three parts

The idea of an interconnected metropolitan park system accessible by foot, bike, carriage, and trolley was invented right here in Greater Boston. Depredations by a massive roadway system built to accommodate ever increasing automobile traffic eroded Greater Boston’s greenway network but did not destroy it. Starting in the 1970s, the environmental movement  began to slowly change people’s attitudes, and the push for a renewed greenway network has continued to gather momentum in the first two decades of the 21st century.

Today, with automobile traffic at an all time high, a growing awareness of the impact of carbon emissions, and a revolution in transportation technology challenging old assumptions, political will to reclaim and reinvent our greenway network is growing. Boston can lead once again.